Differences Between Alloy and Carbon Steel

The vast differences between metal types make the variety you use for a project significant. For example, steel skyscraper construction metals require much more strength than the delicate metals used in producing jewelry.

How can fabricators accurately determine the appropriate steel type? Alloy steel and carbon steel possess specific properties and capabilities to function in different roles. Pennsylvania Steel Co. specializes in steel processing techniques and how to pick a suitable metal for the job. We provide top-quality metals for various east coast locations with warehouses in New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Connecticut, and more. Below we outline the significant characteristic differences between alloy steel and carbon steel.

What is Alloy Steel?

The phrase “alloy steel” is a blanket term to describe the resulting product from mixing metal elements. Common alloying elements include but are not limited to:

  • Silicon
  • Chromium
  • Boron
  • Nickel
  • Aluminum
  • Cobalt
  • Tungsten

The addition of particular alloys affects the steel’s hardness, toughness, wear resistance, heat resistance, and tensile strength.

Types of Alloy Steel

Varying combinations of alloy metals result in different physical properties and characteristics. These combinations fall into one of two general categories:

  • High-Alloy Steel: contains a high percentage of other alloying elements (most commonly: stainless steel, which is approximately 12% chromium)
  • Low-Alloy Steel: contains a lower percentage (1%-5%) of alloying elements, making it generally less costly to use

Uses & Applications

Metalworkers use alloy steel as a manufacturing material in assorted industries, including mining, aerospace, automotive, and railroads. Industrial demand for alloy steel is high, as you can customize its alloying features for diverse structural needs. Its machinability makes it a desirable material for transportation infrastructure and other construction purposes.

What is Carbon Steel?

Put simply, carbon steel is an alloy (mixture) of carbon and iron. The high amount of carbon (ranging from 0.25%-1.25%) in this type of steel makes it incredibly durable and versatile, depending on the specific percentage of carbon.

Types of Carbon Steel

Carbon steel is prevalent and diverse in its applications. In general, carbon steel falls into one of three categories:

  • Low-Carbon Steel (>0.25%): the most widely-used variety of carbon steel that is particularly ductile and welds easily
  • Medium-Carbon Steel (0.25%-0.6%): slightly stronger due to higher manganese concentration (0.6%-1.65%)
  • High-Carbon Steel (0.6%-1.25%): high wear resistance and very low elasticity, with a manganese concentration ranging from 0.3%-0.9%

Typically, this type of steel becomes more challenging to work with as the carbon percentage increases. For this reason, high-carbon steel often has more specialized applications, including springs, wires, and knives.

Uses & Applications

Like alloy steel, carbon steel is useful in numerous industries, especially in the chemical, oil, and gas sectors. Carbon steel’s advanced, versatile strength makes it ideal for pipes, pressure vessels, cutting tools, and even weaponry.

metal processing steel alloys showing heat resistance

Comparing Alloy Steel vs. Carbon Steel

Is carbon steel strong? Is alloy steel stronger than high-carbon steel? These answers depend on what you mean by “strong.” The list of attributes below expands on specific comparisons between steel types, including overall strength.

Chemical Composition

As previously mentioned, carbon steel contains mainly two elements: carbon and iron. Any other present alloys are usually regarded as impurities. On the other hand, alloying of additional components (manganese, nickel, chromium, etc.) in alloy steel alters the chemical properties and limits of the resulting metal.

Strength

Overall, fabricators regard carbon steel as having higher strength than alloy steel. In other words, carbon steel can withstand significant pressure but doesn’t bend easily. Alloying metal variations adjust tensile strength.

Hardness

Carbon steel owes its superior strength to being harder than alloy steel. However, higher carbon content decreases ductility and weldability, making this steel type slightly more challenging to work with.

Melting Point

In general, alloy steel’s additional elements give it a higher melting point than carbon steel.

Malleability

Steel becomes less malleable as you add more alloying metals. Therefore, the lack of variation in carbon steel’s composition allows for better malleability than steel alloys.

Weldability

Alloy steel is difficult to weld and prone to cracking, giving carbon steel higher weldability. However, the prior allows for adjustment of certain alloying elements to help streamline heat treatment.

Corrosion Resistance

Alloy steels have higher corrosion resistance than carbon steel, meaning they deteriorate (rust) at a slower rate.

Cost

The price of carbon steel varies and depends on the metal’s carbon content. As the carbon percentage increases, so does the price. Additionally, alloy steel is often costly due to varying amounts of alloying elements.

Quality Alloy and Carbon Steel from Pennsylvania Steel Co.

Only premium metal materials can craft superior construction projects. The experts at Pennsylvania Steel proudly supply leading manufacturers in numerous sectors throughout the U.S., from Cleveland, OH to Charlotte, NC. If you need alloy or carbon steel for your next project, request a quote from the Pennsylvania Steel Company Inc. team today.

PENNSYLVANIA STEEL ACQUIRES NIVERT METAL SUPPLY

Pennsylvania Steel Company, Inc. today announced that it will purchase certain assets of Nivert Metal Supply,
Inc., a leading metals service center operating in Throop, Pa. The transaction is expected to close by the end of
October.

The acquisition will allow Pennsylvania Steel to expand its geographic customer base while providing
improved service for cut‐to‐size metals in the Northeast. All existing operations of Nivert Metal will continue
in Throop, with Aaron Nivert ‐ son of President Louis Nivert ‐ leading the team as General Manager.

Nivert Metal President Louis Nivert said: “For more than 75 years, this family business has provided quality
material and service to all our customers. But to continue to grow and thrive we need to be part of something
bigger. We believe Pennsylvania Steel shares our values and commitment to customers and employees and are
the right people to continue our legacy moving forward.”

“Nivert Metal joins our eight existing service centers and enhances our network of strategic locations. We are
excited to welcome the Nivert Metal team to the Pennsylvania Steel family,” said Joseph Dombrowski, CEO
and founder of Pennsylvania Steel. “Like Pennsylvania Steel, Nivert Metal has a great reputation in the metals
industry and this acquisition enables us to continue our growth strategy, offering a wider range of products and processing capabilities across the Pennsylvania Steel footprint.”

Nivert Metal offers carbon steel, stainless steel, aluminum, brass, copper and specialty metals for next‐ day
delivery to customers in Northeast Pennsylvania, Southern New York and Eastern New Jersey, as well as a full
range of value‐added processing services, including burning, shearing and saw cutting.

Pennsylvania Steel is a veteran owned privately held full line Metals Service center headquartered in Bensalem PA. Pennsylvania Steel provides raw materials to the metal manufacturing sector through eight Service Center locations. Core products include carbon and alloy Steels, aluminum, stainless, tool steel, and tubing products.

PDF version of this release can be viewed here.

The Top 6 Tips For Welding Aluminum

When it comes to welding, one method doesn’t fit all. Certain qualities of aluminum can make welding a challenge. Leading east coast steel company and metal manufacturer Pennsylvania Steel Co. provides insight into the processing and production of construction materials. Below we offer professional advice for ensuring a safe and effective aluminum welding process.

Aluminum Characteristics

Commercial aluminum alloys offer impressive strength-to-weight ratios and corrosion resistance. These qualities make aluminum a desirable and practical engineering material.

Aluminum is available in numerous forms and grades. They differ in purity, hardness, ductility, thermal conductivity, and various other properties. In other words, aluminum exists in a vast range of types. Here are several commonly utilized grades:

  1. 1100 Aluminum (the purest form of aluminum commercially available)
  2. 3003 Aluminum (most frequently used in the industry, pure aluminum with an addition of manganese)
  3. 5052 Aluminum (excellent resistance against salt water corrosion)
  4. 6061 Aluminum (most commonly used aluminum alloy in construction)
  5. 6063 Aluminum (often referred to as the “architectural alloy” for its use in building structures)

The specific grade of aluminum speaks to its chemical composition. These attributes determine the material’s ultimate application and price point.

Can You Weld Aluminum?

You can weld aluminum, but standard welding methods can be unsafe and ineffective. Aluminum is highly sensitive, susceptible to impurities, and offers a small window of workability. Since pure aluminum is soft and malleable, adding various alloys creates its diversified range of types. Although the element naturally has a low melting point, the tough exterior oxide layer complicates the welding process. 

Why is Welding Aluminum Difficult?

Specific metal properties can make them challenging to weld. For example:

  • Oxidation: the chemical reaction that occurs at the surface of a metal when exposed to oxygen.
  • Porousness: measurement of permeability and other energy absorption properties.
  • Impurities: the presence of trace amounts of other elements.
  • Thickness: the metal’s “gauge,” expressed in mm (millimeters).

Physical properties vary widely in terms of aluminum grades and often present obstacles when welding. The following characteristics can make aluminum difficult to weld:

  • High thermal conductivity (resulting in high dissipation of heat)
  • Hydrogen solubility (causing excessive porosity)
  • Oxide layer (requiring thorough cleaning/preparation)

Types of Aluminum Welding

  • GTAW/TIG welding
  • GMAW/MIG welding
  • Laser beam and electron beam welding
  • Resistance welding
  • Shielded metal arc welding (SMAW)
  • Friction welding

6 Tips for Welding Aluminum

Pennsylvania Steel Co. specializes in metal processing services for commercial fabricators throughout the United States. We possess decades of expertise in the metal production industry. By sharing our expert knowledge, we strive to educate our valued clientele. Above all else, Pennsylvania Steel Co. values its partners’ and customers’ safety, loyalty, and trust. Properly and safely execute your next aluminum weld by following the expert advice we’ve provided below.

1) Clean and prepare your material thoroughly.

Proper preparation of your aluminum alloy is essential to effective welding. Cleaning and degreasing the metal beforehand removes the outer oxide layer. Adequate removal of this tough layer exposes the raw aluminum material, which has a much lower melting point. For reference, pure aluminum melts at 1200ºF while the oxide layer melts at 3700ºF.

2) Correctly store your aluminum materials. 

Adequately storing prepped aluminum prevents re-oxidation. As stated, the oxide layer is tough to remove. You want to avoid additional preparation and scrubbing.

3) Use a heat sink.

A heat sink is a supplemental component that absorbs or dissipates unwanted heat. The appropriate heat sink ensures optimized thermal transfer during the weld.

4) Tailor your technique for different building materials.

As previously mentioned, aluminum’s complex chemical structure can complicate welding as it’s highly sensitive. Before diving in, take the time to do your research, assess your materials, and refine your technique.

5) Always wear proper PPE.

Once again, we aim to educate and protect our clientele. As a result, we urge all of our fabricators to wear the necessary Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) when processing or working with any metal. When welding aluminum, for example, we highly recommend wearing a respirator!

6) Be patient and don’t rush.

Speeding through the welding process is undoubtedly dangerous. No matter how much PPE you wear, the best protection is practiced knowledge!

Allow the Pros at Pennsylvania Steel to Simplify the Welding and Production Process

Our goal at Pennsylvania Steel Company is the success of our valued clientele. We’re advancing this sustainable industry by sharing our expertise, providing superior customer service, and supplying metal fabricators all over the eastern U.S. Beyond our Bensalem, PA facility, we have warehouse locations in New York, Richmond, Virginia, Ohio, North Carolina, and more. We take pride in being a superior steel and pipe supplier and processor for manufacturing businesses throughout the U.S.

Our passion for advancing the steel trade stands over 50 years strong. Numerous industries – including the construction, defense, and technology sectors – rely on our experienced steel company as a vital source of premium metal production and processing services. We’re committed to facilitating growth – as a company, as an industry, and as a community. Request a quote or contact our metal specialists for inquiries regarding our product lines and services. 

The Difference Between Cold-Finished and Hot-Rolled Steel

Business owners and makers have thousands of steel varieties on the market to choose from. With such an array of metal options, selecting the correct type, grade, and finish of your building material can be tedious. Pennsylvania Steel Co. offers a vast assortment of premium steel products at locations all over the United States. Plus, our online resources help our clients build the best projects possible.

Steel Manufacturing, Summarized

Not to be mistaken with the four main types of steel, the general steel manufacturing process falls into two main categories: hot-rolled and cold-rolled. This process starts with the extreme heating and consequent oxidation of mined steel ore.Basically, pieces of large, rectangular metal called billets are heated and flattened into sizable rolls. 

From there, the steel will go through one of the aforementioned rolling processes for its finalized design. “Rolling” refers to the vital step in the manufacturing process that involves forming the metal by using a series of rollers in an attempt to reshape it or enhance its properties. This formation method (hot or cold rolling) will determine the material’s ultimate function.

Hot Finishing Process vs. Cold Finishing Process

"In the conversation about hot-rolled vs. cold-finished products, all cold-finished products are hot-rolled, but hot-rolled products are not necessarily cold finished. Instead, it’s all a matter of how the bars are processed."

ryerson.com

Once steel is heated past its recrystallization temperature (over 1700º F) it can be easily formed and sized. If the material isn’t processed further at room temperature, it’s considered hot-rolled. The steel that goes through further refinement processes is categorized as cold-rolled. Explore further metal rolling methodology differences, capabilities, and tolerances below!

Hot-Rolled Steel

As hot-rolled steel cools, it tends to shrink and form asymmetrically, allowing for more variation in shape and size. For this reason, hot-rolled steel is used in projects where the finished product doesn’t have specific dimensional requirements.

For example, one of the most commonly recognized forms of hot-rolled steel is sheet metal, which is frequently used in creating air ducts and motor vehicles. In these applications, surface finish and proportions don’t need to be precise.

As a result, hot-rolled steel is typically cheaper in price simply because it doesn’t involve any further processing. Since it doesn’t require any reheating, production costs for hot-rolled steel are much lower.

Cold-Finished Steel

That being said, cold-rolled steel needs reheating to further refine its structural properties. In order to achieve more exact dimensions and surface quality, the metal is re-rolled at a lower temperature. This supplemental rolling results in more specified attributes including exterior finish, durability, and dimensional parameters. 

PA Steel, for example, carries a variety of cold-finished bars in a range of grades and finishes for businesses all over the eastern United States. This equipment is used for creating products such as furniture, garages, and home appliances.

Although it’s typically up to 20% more durable than hot-rolled, cold-finished steel is limited to basic square, round, and flat shapes. Despite its improved resistance, the additional processing performed on cold-rolled metals may make it more susceptible to internal stress. Finalized materials need to be stress relieved prior to grinding or cutting to avoid potentially volatile warping or distortion.

Determining the Appropriate Steel Type

Put simply, the last step in the manufacturing process will influence the final product’s application. If tolerance, surface finish, symmetry, straightness, or aesthetics are a key factor in the project’s creation, cold-rolled steel is likely the ideal choice. Conversely, hot-rolled steel can be used for large-scale or low-budget operations that can account for dimensional changes as it cools.

Tolerance Variety

The table below outlines the varying tolerances of hot-rolled vs. cold-finished steel products:

Data source: rapiddirect.com/blog/hot-rolled-vs-cold-rolled-steel

Premium Steel and Pipe Supply From Pennsylvania Steel, Co.

Visit our new and improved website to browse our selection of high-quality products, including several varieties of cold and hot-rolled steel, plus carbon tubing, stainless steel, finished bars, and more. PA Steel Company employs an expert team of industry professionals that are prepared to supply you with the ideal metal for any size project. Browse our locations in Pennsylvania, Richmond, Cleveland, Charlotte, Long Island, and more!

If you’re still having trouble figuring out the ideal steel production process for your project, check out our FAQ page or request a quote online today!

Employee Spotlight: Jonathon Albert

We would like to welcome Jonathon Albert to Pennsylvania Steel. Jonathon has been promoted to General Manager of our York Division. Jonathan has been in the Service Center Industry since 2006 and has held numerous positions, including Business Development, Inside Sales, Manager of Business Operations and Contracts, and Regional Controller. He holds a bachelor’s degree in Marketing from Clarion University, a master’s degree in Accounting from Mercer University, and earned his MBA from The University of Louisville. Welcome to the team!

How is Aluminum Made?

Although it’s the most abundant metallic element in the Earth’s crust, aluminum never occurs in its metallic form in nature. Its compounds, however, are present in nearly every form of vegetation, mineral, and animal.

When the silvery-white metal is isolated (first achieved in 1825), we wind up with the periodic element Aluminum (Al). Thanks to the modern method of producing aluminum, it surpassed copper in world production of nonferrous metals back in the 1960s. Today’s seamless process – electrolysis of purified alumina dissolved in cryolite – has allowed aluminum to remain widely used in several settings for decades.

Basic Properties & Structure

What is aluminum?

Natural aluminum compounds are universally present in igneous rocks and various gemstones. Ancient Egyptians and Babylonians used organic clay for assorted projects, including pottery, medicines, and textiles. It wasn’t until the late 18th century that experts recognized aluminum for its application as a metal.

The versatility of this metal is due to its ability to be combined with other alloys (ex: magnesium or silicon) in small amounts to diversify its applications. Although pure aluminum is malleable and somewhat brittle, commercial aluminum is very strong while still relatively flexible.

aluminum periodic table

What's the difference between aluminum and steel?

Steel is more rigid than traditional aluminum and is more durable because it’s more than twice as dense. Both steel and aluminum consist of a combination of two elements. Steel contains iron and carbon, while aluminum contains bauxite and cryolite.

Features & Manufacturing Process

What does the procedure look like for creating aluminum?

Stage 1: Finding the Ore

  • As previously mentioned, the metallic aluminum alloy doesn’t appear anywhere in nature. As a result, it can only be extracted from naturally occurring compounds.
  • Ore is the natural rock or sediment that contains one or more valuable minerals in the form of clay, slate, or granite sediments. The essential aluminum ore is bauxite. Bauxite is commonly found in deposits close to the Earth’s surface and contains about 52% aluminum oxide with iron oxide impurities.

Stage 2: Mining

  • Investigatory drilling allows geologists and researchers to determine the location of bauxite deposits for mining alumina. Once found, they extract the bauxite and remove the earth using various methods, including blasting, drilling, and ripping with specialized bulldozers. The resulting product is alumina: the raw, crystalline form of bauxite. 
  • Four tons of high-quality bauxite will produce approximately two tons of alumina, from which producers can manufacture about a ton of pure aluminum.

Stage 3: Refining the Bauxite (Using the Bayer Process)

  • In the first step of the Bayer Process (Digestion), the bauxite is ground, mixed with caustic soda, and pressurized. This step separates unwanted impurities and forms what is known as sodium aluminate.
  • The second step (Clarification) involves reducing the pressure, removing the separated impurities, and cooling the clarified solution.
  • In step three (Precipitation), the addition of aluminum hydroxide seed crystals results in precipitation, causing the aluminum to become solid.
  • The fourth and final step (Calcination) entails a thermal treatment process using rotary kilns. This heating method removes remaining impurities, and the subsequent material is the alumina or aluminum oxide.

Stage 4: Smelting

  • The last stage of aluminum processing is called smelting, also referred to as the Hall-Héroult process, invented in 1886. Smelting, which takes place in steel reduction pots, extricates the aluminum from the alumina.
  • The resulting molten solution – 99.8% pure – is poured into molds and cast. Subsequently, it can be alloyed with other metals or refined to create super pure aluminum (99.99%).

Why choose aluminum metal for my project?

If you’re trying to determine the appropriate alloy for your construction project, you may consider multifaceted aluminum for its many benefits:

  • Lightweight
  • Flexible
  • Impermeable
  • Recyclable
  • Odorless
  • Corrosion Resistance
  • Ductility
  • Electrical and Thermal Conductivity
aluminum supplier near me

Applications & Availability

What is aluminum used for?

Since this alloy is so versatile, its applications span enterprises and industries of all types. Some of the most recognizable aluminum functions include aerospace construction, food-processing equipment, household appliances, and electrical conductors. Because of its high corrosion resistance and conductivity, aluminum is ideal for manufacturing various consumer and commercial products.

Who supplies premium aluminum near me?

Are you looking for top-quality metal and alloy supplies near you? Pennsylvania Steel Company is the trusted manufacturer for premium metals all over the east coast and beyond – from Charlotte, North Carolina, and Long Island, New York to Cleveland, Ohio. The best aluminum supply company is your nearest PA Steel sales office, where our team is eager to provide you with superior materials for your next project. Contact our sales office in your area to receive fast, dependable customer support regarding local inquiries.

What are the Different Types of Steel?

Since steel is so versatile in its uses, reliable steel companies like Pennsylvania Steel offer various steel types for the multitude of projects our customers execute. The material’s type is determined by two main factors: the individual amounts of its alloy components (such as carbon and iron) and its production process.

The Four Main Types of Steel

Although there are technically over 3,500 types of steel available on the market with varying physical properties, we’re not going to provide you with a complete list of steel types. Instead, we will focus on four predominant types of steel: carbon steel, alloy steel, stainless steel, and tool steel. Learning the differences between these will help you understand which is the best for your project and why it’s the best for the job.

pa steel types of metal

Carbon Steel

As the name suggests, carbon steel contains mainly carbon and iron, and a trace of other elements (such as magnesium or chromium). There are three main subcategories of carbon steel which include:

  1. Low Carbon Steels (less than 0.3% carbon)
  2. Medium Carbon Steels (0.3% – 0.6% carbon)
  3. High Carbon Steels (greater than 0.6% carbon)

This specific profile will define the applications for your carbon steel type. While low carbon steels are very flexible and easy to work with, high carbon steels offer the most strength.

Generally, this type of steel is used in materials such as construction equipment and automotive components. In fact, carbon steel accounts for about 90% of total steel production in the entire industry because it’s inexpensive to produce and durable enough for use in large commercial projects. 

Alloy Steel

The name “alloy steel” suggests a large mix of different elements in addition to the characteristic carbon and iron combination. Examples of common additives are:

  • Magnesium
  • Chromium
  • Nickel
  • Silicon
  • Molybdenum
  • Titanium
  • Copper

The percentages of these elements will determine the appropriate application for the material. Manipulating these proportions changes the steel’s properties, such as heat resistance, hardness, and ductility. Companies often utilize this type of steel to produce commercial equipment like aerospace and aircraft components, transformers, pipelines, and power generators.

Stainless Steel

Steel in this category contains 10-20% chromium, making it incredibly resistant to corrosion and staining. This concentrated chromium coating also makes this material rust-proof. Classified by their microscopic structures, there are three subsets of stainless steel:

TYPE OF STAINLESS STEELGRADEPROPERTIES% ALLOYING ELEMENTSCOMMON USES
Austenitic300non-magnetic and non-heat-treatable18% chromium
8% nickel
<0.8% carbon
kitchen and food processing equipment
Ferritic400magnetic10.5-27% chromium
<0.1% carbon

heat exchangers and furnaces, auto parts
Martensitic400magnetic and heat-treatable
11-17% chromium
<0.4% nickel
<1.2% carbon
cutting tools, dental and surgical equipment

Stainless steel is a highly versatile material due to its notable resistance to heat and discoloration. Its unique resilience makes it the best type of steel for a number of industries, ranging from culinary and catering to standard machinery and cars.

Tool Steel

A combination of carbon and alloy steel, tool steel generally offers high hardness and abrasion resistance. These features, along with its superior ability to retain its shape, make it the ideal material for composing various tools. Surgical equipment, drills, dyes, bits, molds, and punches are examples of instruments made using tool steel.

Manufacturing quality tools requires quality steel components. PA Steel produces a number of different tool steels, which consist of carbon and alloy steels. Tool steel offers advanced abrasion resistance and toughness. We stock many different tool steel grades, including:

  • Air Hardening (A-Grades)
  • High-Carbon High-Chromium (D-Grades)
  • Shock Resisting (S-Grades)
  • Mold Quality/Hot Work (H-Grades
  • Oil Hardening (O-Grades
  • Water Hardening (W-Grades)

To learn more about our tool steel inventory, grades, and their applications, check out our detailed Tool Steel Guide.

Choosing The Best Steel For Your Project

As previously mentioned, the selected steel’s type identifies its key properties, including ductility, hardness, weldability, and more. Naturally, these qualities will determine the applied uses of the chosen metal.

In other words, selecting the wrong metal can prove detrimental to the quality of your project. For example, high alloy or low carbon steels are most effective in extremely cold temperatures because they retain high tensile strength even in frigid conditions. Therefore, residential and commercial structures being built in freezing climates should use these types of metals in their structural designs.

If you’re unsure about what your metal project requires, feel free to contact the specialists at Pennsylvania Steel for further insight into your ideal metal for the job. We can help you confirm your choice and walk you through your potential options for a high-quality result!

Contact PA Steel For a Custom Quote

Regardless of the job you take on, PA Steel offers a wide stock of the different types and grades of steel to help you prepare for your next project. Our knowledgeable staff has years of expertise, so feel free to contact the steel warehouse closest to you with any questions or to receive an estimate. We have steel supply warehouses in Pennsylvania, Virginia (Richmond), New York, New England, North Carolina (Charlotte), and Ohio.

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Sean Wenhold New NC General Manager

Pa Steel would like to congratulate Sean Wenhold on becoming General Manager of our North Carolina and Virginia offices. Sean is an experienced Sales Manager with a demonstrated history of working in the steel distribution and manufacturing industries. We are proud to see Sean advance and grow his already substantial financial, business, and operational management skills and sales knowledge. As of July 6th, 2021, you will find Sean in Pennsylvania Steel Company’s Stanley office in North Carolina. Congratulations to Sean and welcome to North Carolina.
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Employee Spotlight: Melanie Morril

I started at Pennsylvania Steel New England in 2009.  My initial responsibilities included billing, shipping & allocating, and receiving.  Because of these various duties, I was able to learn about Pennsylvania Steel’s products and its operation.

Shortly after that, I was promoted to Office Manager, responsible for accounting, and hiring staff to fulfill the billing, shipping & allocating, and reception positions expanding our PSC New England family.  Eventually, my position also evolved to include HR responsibilities.

As Office Manager, I also have the opportunity to work with Tony Luongo our GM and be involved in many projects ranging with OSHA Safety Manual, IT and DOT.  PSC New England recently obtained its ISO 9001: 2008 certification and am a proud participate in the ISO Core Group and am an Internal Auditor.

I feel very fortunate to work at Pennsylvania Steel Company.  My co-workers at PSC New England are a hardworking, humorous and supportive group, which makes working at Pennsylvania Steel so enjoyable. I am grateful and enthusiastic about being part of this growing company and look forward to the new challenges each day brings.

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Employee Spotlight: Kathleen Esposito

I started my metal career at Davidson Aluminum in 1995.  I was hired for the shipping and receiving department, where I was responsible for shippers and certifications.  I stayed with Davidson until they closed their doors in 1999. I was offered a similar position at Transtar Metals, who had purchased one of the Davidson companies. I stayed with them until they relocated to Connecticut.  Afterwards, I moved on to work for New England Motor Freight, where I gained experience in trucking for a few years.  

In 2006 I received a call from John and Joe from Metal Connections asking me to join their team/family. I had previously worked with both of them at Davidson Aluminum. There, I took on a role in the shipping department. Little by little they taught me the sales end of the metal business.

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It took a while to gather the confidence and knowledge required to be in sales, due to the fact that I had worked primarily in the warehouse. I was surprised by how much I knew about metal and the time and effort it takes to process the material.  Through trial and error, I learned my sales skills, of which I am proud of. 

In 2012, Pennsylvania Steel Company, Inc. purchased Metal Connections. John had spoken to us before he sold the business and explained that by joining a bigger, family owned company, we would have more opportunity and security in the future. I decided to join a bigger team/family which I am happy to be part of.

As the senior sales person in Long Island, I get to be a part of the challenge and opportunity to help build a company that will last a long time. I hope to continue to be able to represent and call Pennsylvania Steel my home for many years.  

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I started my metal career at Davidson Aluminum in 1995.  I was hired for the shipping and receiving department, where I was responsible for shippers and certifications.  I stayed with Davidson until they closed their doors in 1999. I was offered a similar position at Transtar Metals, who had purchased one of the Davidson companies. I stayed with them until they relocated to Connecticut.  Afterwards, I moved on to work for New England Motor Freight, where I gained experience in trucking for a few years.  

In 2006 I received a call from John and Joe from Metal Connections asking me to join their team/family. I had previously worked with both of them at Davidson Aluminum. There, I took on a role in the shipping department. Little by little they taught me the sales end of the metal business. It took a while to gather the confidence and knowledge required to be in sales, due to the fact that I had worked primarily in the warehouse. I was surprised by how much I knew about metal and the time and effort it takes to process the material.  Through trial and error, I learned my sales skills, of which I am proud of. 

In 2012, Pennsylvania Steel Company, Inc. purchased Metal Connections. John had spoken to us before he sold the business and explained that by joining a bigger, family owned company, we would have more opportunity and security in the future. I decided to join a bigger team/family which I am happy to be part of.  As the senior sales person in Long Island, I get to be a part of the challenge and opportunity to help build a company that will last a long time. I hope to continue to be able to represent and call Pennsylvania Steel my home for many years.  

PENNSYLVANIA STEEL ACQUIRES NIVERT METAL SUPPLY